3D Systems and HII's Newport News to develop 3D metal printers

3D Systems has entered a collaborative project for the development of metal additive manufacturing technologies in order to help increase the adoption of 3D printing in the construction of US Navy warships.

The deal will see the company partner with Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Newport News Shipbuilding division to support various future qualification and certification programmes required for the implementation of advanced manufacturing technology for the navy.

“The ProX DMP 320 printer system, combined with our team’s expertise in metal 3D printing technology, will bring new, digitally enhanced geometries to Newport News Shipbuilding.”

The collaboration forms part of a major technological transformation named Digital Shipbuilding (iDS), which is currently being carried out by Newport News Shipbuilding.

3D Systems and HII will move portions of their traditional production processes to additive manufacturing under the initiative, which is expected to increase the production rate of high-accuracy parts, while ensuring a reduction in wastage and supporting significant cost savings.

3D Systems has delivered and installed the ProX DMP 320 high-performance metal additive manufacturing system at the Newport News shipyard as part of the arrangement.

Commenting on the partnership, 3D Systems Metals and Healthcare executive vice-president and general manager Kevin McAlea said: “3D Systems is pleased to play an integral role in transforming the naval shipbuilding industry.

“The ProX DMP 320 printer system, combined with our team’s expertise in metal 3D printing technology, will bring new, digitally enhanced geometries to Newport News Shipbuilding, enabling higher performing warship components and ultimately more efficient, cost-effective parts delivery to the US Navy.�

The advanced metal 3D printing machine can be used to produce three-dimensional, marine-based alloy replacement parts for castings or other fabricated parts such as valves, housings and brackets for the US Navy’s future nuclear-powered vessels.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *